George White studied art in London before becoming the chief specialist figure painter on vases, plates, cups and saucers at Doulton’s Burslem Studio. He painted figures, usually maidens in romantic scenes and wearing diaphanous garments. He uses soft and delicate colours and was able to depict the translucent quality of these robes in realistic and very lovely detail. He also decorated Luscian ware, one of Charles Noke’s many specialties. It is an enamelled pottery and tended to be decorated in the Art Nouveau style from around 1900. George’s vases and plates must have taken hours of painstaking work to decorate, and together with the rarity value of these finest pieces, it’s no wonder they are much sought after now.

English silver has, for centuries, been accepted as the finest in the world. This is due to the unique system of Hallmarks, the zeal and zealous traditions of the Guild of English Goldsmiths. The birth of the industrial revolution and the introduction of tea as a national drink in the 18th century provided wealth for the common person. They could buy silver and the crafting of silver became a major art form. It must be noted that most English Silversmiths concentrated on good quality and design, instead of price. The high quality is the reason why English silver has lasted so long and will continue to be enjoyed by many future generations.

When James Hadley started his apprenticeship, Royal Worcester was still known as Kerr and Binns of Worcester. Such was his skill that by 1870, he became the chief designer in the factory. John Sandon, a well-respected British authority on glass and ceramics, described James Hadley as “probably the finest English modeller of all time”. He was said to be able to work in any style or form but is best known for his decorative figures. Perhaps one of his most famous models was the “Aesthetic Teapot”. In 1875, he left the Worcester factory and set up his own. James Hadley had a somewhat turbulent career. Yet, he left some of the finest models ever produced.