Rugs are a thing of beauty, especially the nicely coloured and patterned rugs. They can be used as pieces of furniture or ornaments. However, in past times, they were quite functional to the people of the Asian regions. These rugs were known with the nomads of Southern Asia who made rugs just for their own use for comfort and for warmth from the wool of their herds. Eventually, from the 15th century when designs changed, rug making became commercial and ways of production changed. Rugs have become antiques and they are valued for their intricacies. Older pieces can still be found in museums today.

Bow porcelain factory was an English soft-paste porcelain factory founded by Thomas Frye. He was a talented Irish engraver alongside his partner, Edward Heylyn. Bow factory rivalled the Chelsea porcelain factory, the two of which were the first in England. Bow made some quality cheaper sprigged tableware in white. Imitating imported Chinese wares, the tableware came in blue and white porcelain with floral underglaze decoration. Just like other factories around the globe, the Kakiemon style of the Japanese export porcelain was also trending at Bow. While some Bow figures imitated Chelsea models, many more imitated Meissen. Following the Bow factory’s rapid expansion, they had become the largest English factory of its time.